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The Olympics ticket lottery: deconstructed

Yesterday the nation found out its fate: were we or were we not destined to get a ticket to see the Olympics. Throughout the day the media covered the nation’s reactions to the sums of money disappearing from bank accounts as the only clue as to what exactly the lucky few hundred thousand would be seeing in 2012 when the Olympic Games come to town.

Looking at social media, the trends were fascinating to see unfold. We thought it would be a good idea to do a roundup of what we were tracking.

Word cloud of 'Olympics' on Twitter. (Word Olympics removed to highlight conversation).

Word cloud of 'Olympics' on Twitter. (Word Olympics removed to highlight conversation).

Social media activity peaked on Twitter at 9am, with 8am showing the second highest volume. The top tweets were from influencers including Richard Bacon and Paul Waugh and the resounding sentiment was that the ticket lottery system had failed.

What can we learn from this? Timing of a trending story is early in the day, and should the Olympics Committee have wanted to engage (which would of course never have happened, but if they did want to) then some lessons around fostering more positives than negatives can be taken from this.

Yesterday the Olympics was talked about more than it has been all year, and for all the wrong reasons. And what will come next? Expect the big peak to be around what tickets people actually got…

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Drew wrote this on June 2, 2011
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